fredag, mars 17, 2006

Nye mattrender

Hva blir fremtidens restaurant?

Det er mange meninger om dette tema, og ingen kan være i tvil om at vi som er glad i god mat og drikke må følge denne debatten nøye, og helst være aktiv deltager i hva som presenteres.

I USA, for dette er et innspill fra St.Petersburg, USA, og ikke Russland, er det spesielt Grant Achat, fra Chicago som er nr.1.
Men alt har sitt utspring fra El Bulli i Spania.

Innspillet du finner her er i allefall interessant:

Chef's Table:
A case for what the future holds


Evos, the self-proclaimed healthy bay area restaurant chain, claims to be "the future of fast food." While I hope time will prove its young, maverick founders right, I often wonder what the future of food, fast or not, actually is.

By GUI ALINAT
Published March 15, 2006

Evos, the self-proclaimed healthy bay area restaurant chain, claims to be "the future of fast food." While I hope time will prove its young, maverick founders right, I often wonder what the future of food, fast or not, actually is.

Following cyclic eras of prosperity and chaos, food supplies have had a heck of a time, roughing it through the Great Depression and then rationing during World War II. After that came irresistible delicacies such as TV dinners, Jell-O, Rice-A-Roni and Spam. Along with convenience and comfort, some processed foods also brought the threat of obesity and cardiovascular disease.

What will be on the dinner table in decades to come?

The future of food may very well look like what chefs like Spaniard Ferran "the alchemist" Adria, or Chicago's Grant Achatz are feeding their diners. These chefs of the future don't grill, roast or saut?. They atomize, explode and vacuum-pack. They manipulate ingredients, often using laboratory equipment such as laser microwaves, atomizers or centrifuges. They serve intriguing oddities such as "squid syringes," "Parmesan marshmallows," "vinegar powder," "spherical raviolis" and, I hear, a helium-filled steak floating over your plate, but that might be urban legend.

Regardless, using new techniques, the vanguard chefs push the limits of haute cuisine. Like nouvelle cuisine in its time, the mid 1970s, this experimentation is necessary for culinary progression.

One of the worst threats to natural and historic foodways is the rise of Frankenfoods. Genetically engineered foods have quietly filled our grocery stores without us knowing it. Though massive biotech companies tell us that they provide the solution to world starvation, genetically engineered foods raise social and environmental concerns.

I am not an economist, a scientist or a psychic, just a chef and a consumer. But I want my future made of good food, nutritionally sound and economically, environmentally sustainable.

Clearly, in the next century, chefs as well as consumers won't be able to ignore the issues that threaten the food we eat. It's called responsible cooking and some famous chefs, such as Charlie Trotter, have already hinted at the problem.
Either way, the future of food, and the enjoyment of it, is closely tied with our ability to recognize, and choose according to social, environmental, and economical sensibility, as well as, of course, taste.

Maybe the time has come for us to ask our government, for instance, why it has resisted efforts to require GMO labeling on foods, as Europe does.

Half a century from now, I bet most independent restaurants will be gone. The few that remain will offer high-end, experimental cuisine, or local comfort food and all-organic menus. Mammoth companies will control virtually all restaurant business, as well as the entire food chain. Though chain restaurants provide a fair product and consistent quality, they lack individuality and craft. They satisfy most, but bore me.

I predict competitive hot dog eating contests will survive. Gluttony is to remain forever.

Chef Gui Alinat welcomes questions about cooking and will respond to those of general interest in future columns. Sorry, he can't take phone calls or answer individual requests. Send questions to him in care of Taste, St. Petersburg Times, P.O. Box 1121, St. Petersburg, FL 33731, or e-mail him at:
chefgui@chefgui.com
Please include your name and city of residence.

Bjørn Henry bjornhenry@gmail.com
tel. 92499442
www.egifteurope.com
www.egiftdownloads.com

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